Sit down and apply your makeup in style at this dramatic mirrored vanity set. Crafted of solid and manufactured wood in a pewter gray finish, this vanity strikes a rectangular silhouette with simple moldings, mirror-paneled sides, and a curvy, four-legged trestle base measuring 30.25" H x 32"W x 18" D overall. The front of the vanity folds down and the middle of the vanity top lifts up to reveal hidden storage space for jewelry and a brilliant detail mirror, while a matching, upholstered vanity...
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While hippy styles were born in the ’60s, they developed in the ’70s to become a key look for the decade. One of the most famous styles of the era, hippy outfits often featured unique, colourful designs. While cuts were kept simple and styles remained casual, the trend was bold and expressive. Denim, suede, bright prints and patterns, and flares all played a significant role in the trend. Although full hippy outfits can appear overly excessive in today’s environment, elements from the style can easily be incorporated to create a chic and modern, hipster look.

“Politically, it's really important for us to represent the importance of community building among women. We find ourselves working with women, women of color specifically—female photographers, female creative directors, women from all [specialties]—that's really important for us because so often I feel like women are not represented, even in the fashion industry, the way that they should be. Working with youth is another thing that's really important for Darlene—she's an educator outside of being a designer, so I think she feels growing up here that our youth is often forgotten about and we need to start there.”
In the ’70s, aerobics began to rise in popularity and, as a result, sporty-chic fashion became a major style. The trend, which is somewhat an original version of today’s athleisure look, combined comfort with style for a relaxed yet elegant appearance. More specifically, the look favoured minimalist shapes and silhouettes and injected casual wear with athletic styles, such as sports jackets, sneakers, jogging suits, caps, and T-shirts. This trend is easily wearable thanks to sports luxe looks. To add a more original feel, simply include some identifiable 70’s details, such as a turtleneck sweater, to your outfit.  

There are women like Lizzy Okpo, who founded the women's wear brand William Okpo with her sister, Darlene; Aurora James of the mega-popular accessories label Brother Vellies, which has been spotted on Tessa Thompson and Beyoncé; and the up-and-coming Shanel Campbell of Shanel, a recent Parsons graduate who has already dressed Tracee Ellis Ross, Ciara, and Solange. For them, being “conscious” isn’t an afterthought—it’s what drives them as artists.
“When things shifted politically a few years ago in the U.S., it was important to me to I speak out, because I could see that a lot of marginalized communities were going to be really affected, including several of the communities I’m a part of. I felt that, as someone with a platform—albeit a small one—it was still my responsibility. Still, on a weekly basis, we upset people.”
“I think that every single designer needs to really be aware of how many of the things that they’re making already exist in landfills. We have a responsibility to only bring things to life that are going to live extremely long lives. For example: A lot of people are like, 'Oh, it's vegan leather'—well, vegan leather is plastic, and plastic breaks. It's not good for clothes, there's no longevity. I want to always challenge my fellow designers, creative people, and really people of all industries to say: If you're going to be manufacturing these things, how can these things be leaving a positive impact? Not just a neutral impact or a negative impact—a positive impact.”
“Politically, it's really important for us to represent the importance of community building among women. We find ourselves working with women, women of color specifically—female photographers, female creative directors, women from all [specialties]—that's really important for us because so often I feel like women are not represented, even in the fashion industry, the way that they should be. Working with youth is another thing that's really important for Darlene—she's an educator outside of being a designer, so I think she feels growing up here that our youth is often forgotten about and we need to start there.”
Seeing people like Okpo, James, and Campbell succeed by remaining steadfast in their beliefs and working to make this industry better gives me hope, yes, but it's more than that: It gives me a road map. Here, Okpo, James, and Campbell detail how they integrate their social political beliefs into their fashion—and why other designers should do the same.
“It's important for designers to work for a bigger purpose, because fashion is so small. If you remove the social aspect of it and if you remove the day-to-day lifestyle of it, then we're just left with a pair of pretty shoes—and who cares? That's so disposable. You have to tell a story...you have to really touch people beyond yourself. It's bigger than you, it's bigger than us.”
While hippy styles were born in the ’60s, they developed in the ’70s to become a key look for the decade. One of the most famous styles of the era, hippy outfits often featured unique, colourful designs. While cuts were kept simple and styles remained casual, the trend was bold and expressive. Denim, suede, bright prints and patterns, and flares all played a significant role in the trend. Although full hippy outfits can appear overly excessive in today’s environment, elements from the style can easily be incorporated to create a chic and modern, hipster look.
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