“I'm inspired by anything black. Black artists, musicians, activism. James Baldwin, Angela Davis, David Hilliard, Nina Simone—they inspired a project I just did, where each one inspired a look, but you wouldn't know from looking at it. I'm not trying to be so straightforward. If that were the case, I would just take my research and put it on a graphic T-shirt. The thing that informs all of my work is the black experience. That's just how my brain works, I can't help it. It's exciting to know that some people get the reference, no matter how secretive or subtle it may be.”
Fashion still has a lot of work to do when it comes to diversifying its talent pool. In February 2015 only 2.7 percent of the designers on the New York Fashion Week calendar were black, according to The New York Times; by February 2018 that statistic was still under 10 percent, per The Cut. And there have been regular reminders why this is critical: Designer products resembling blackface or nooses have sparked calls for boycotts and increased demands that companies take steps to diversify and educate their employees and provide new opportunities for people of color. Amid the headlines and outcry, black fashion designers keep doing the work: creating and advocating for more inclusive fashion through their products and every single facet of their business. 

That doesn't mean the work is easy. I recently founded my own business, The Folklore, an online retail concept store that stocks brands exclusively from Africa and the African diaspora. Already I’ve had to defend the earning potential of African designers to prospective non-African venture capitalists and investors, who were convinced that they wouldn’t sell well among non-African audiences. (Most of the pieces on my site have sold out.) I’ve argued against long-standing stereotypes that paint Africa’s business climate broadly as corrupt. I’ve invested my own money to launch the company, trusting that my vision will translate.
Every girl wishes to have a glamorous dressing table with all her jewelry and makeup, let it realize your princess dream! Beautiful and elegant black dressing table with round mirror and cushioned stool. The table with 3 drawers is great for storing all your jewelry, little treasures, and makeup. A smooth tabletop provides space for cosmetics and beauty supplies and also includes a matching wooden elegant stool. This is sure to add elegance and style to your bedroom.
I LOVE this mascara. I have been using it for years. I have tried expensive mascara from high end brands, and everything in between. This is one I always come back to. The formula is great, but I think it’s the brush that does the real magic. I have even thoroughly cleaned the bottle and brush of an old bottle that I was done with, and used the brush with one of my crazy expensive name brand mascaras. The formula does start to get a little clumpy when it starts to get old, or if you keep using too many layers (and I mean like 5 or 6 layers). Thinking about stocking up...just in case they take it away or discontinue it for some reason... 

Whether you're prepping for a day at work or gearing up to go out with the girls, you'll be perfectly perched with this vanity set. Taking on a contemporary clean-lined silhouette, both the vanity and stool feature a metal frame with openwork cross designs and a metallic finish. A tempered glass top and storage shelf are ideal for keeping all your toiletries corralled, while an adjustable mirror lets you check your look. Plus, its seat is topped off with faux fur for a little luxe allure.
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