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“I'm inspired by anything black. Black artists, musicians, activism. James Baldwin, Angela Davis, David Hilliard, Nina Simone—they inspired a project I just did, where each one inspired a look, but you wouldn't know from looking at it. I'm not trying to be so straightforward. If that were the case, I would just take my research and put it on a graphic T-shirt. The thing that informs all of my work is the black experience. That's just how my brain works, I can't help it. It's exciting to know that some people get the reference, no matter how secretive or subtle it may be.”
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“I think that every single designer needs to really be aware of how many of the things that they’re making already exist in landfills. We have a responsibility to only bring things to life that are going to live extremely long lives. For example: A lot of people are like, 'Oh, it's vegan leather'—well, vegan leather is plastic, and plastic breaks. It's not good for clothes, there's no longevity. I want to always challenge my fellow designers, creative people, and really people of all industries to say: If you're going to be manufacturing these things, how can these things be leaving a positive impact? Not just a neutral impact or a negative impact—a positive impact.”
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There are women like Lizzy Okpo, who founded the women's wear brand William Okpo with her sister, Darlene; Aurora James of the mega-popular accessories label Brother Vellies, which has been spotted on Tessa Thompson and Beyoncé; and the up-and-coming Shanel Campbell of Shanel, a recent Parsons graduate who has already dressed Tracee Ellis Ross, Ciara, and Solange. For them, being “conscious” isn’t an afterthought—it’s what drives them as artists.
When you find yourself looking through a set of toiletries and accessories for the right makeup, brushes, and everything else in the morning, it’s time to get organized. With this vanity table set, you’ll not only be able to organize your important items, but you’ll also have a designated space of your own that looks like a scene out of a movie. It’s not just you looking gorgeous: Freshen yourself up to start a day with energy and a gorgeous look with this equally gorgeous dressing...
“I think that every single designer needs to really be aware of how many of the things that they’re making already exist in landfills. We have a responsibility to only bring things to life that are going to live extremely long lives. For example: A lot of people are like, 'Oh, it's vegan leather'—well, vegan leather is plastic, and plastic breaks. It's not good for clothes, there's no longevity. I want to always challenge my fellow designers, creative people, and really people of all industries to say: If you're going to be manufacturing these things, how can these things be leaving a positive impact? Not just a neutral impact or a negative impact—a positive impact.”
Ann Lowe, the woman who made Jacqueline Kennedy’s wedding dress, carved a path for herself, becoming the first black designer to open a boutique on Madison Avenue, and paved the way for many others. (Finally, people are recognizing it.) From 1958 to 2009, the Ebony Fashion Fair, founded by businesswoman Eunice W. Johnson, created a space not just for black designers and models to show their work, but also for black shoppers to spend. By the early 2000s brands like Baby Phat were introducing products to the market that addressed the needs of this previously underserved customer, like jeans that fit curves.
“It's important for designers to work for a bigger purpose, because fashion is so small. If you remove the social aspect of it and if you remove the day-to-day lifestyle of it, then we're just left with a pair of pretty shoes—and who cares? That's so disposable. You have to tell a story...you have to really touch people beyond yourself. It's bigger than you, it's bigger than us.”

It seems like every week a fashion brand is rallying behind a political candidate, collaborating with a nonprofit, or announcing a new sustainability initiative—in other words, companies are trying to prove they are more “conscious.” Being “conscious” has become a talking point. Credit the current political climate or the idea that customers want to shop their values, but more and more designers are being vocal about where they stand on certain issues, and companies are increasingly transparent about their business or manufacturing practices.
Start with the show stoppers – a glam bedroom set, chandelier dripping with crystals, or velvet sofa – and add shimmering accents, fluffy textiles, and art deco-inspired wall décor. Select pieces with embellishments such as nailhead trim on a glam chair, tufting on an ottoman, or sequins or intricate embroidery on throw pillows to add even more eye-catching detail.
It seems like every week a fashion brand is rallying behind a political candidate, collaborating with a nonprofit, or announcing a new sustainability initiative—in other words, companies are trying to prove they are more “conscious.” Being “conscious” has become a talking point. Credit the current political climate or the idea that customers want to shop their values, but more and more designers are being vocal about where they stand on certain issues, and companies are increasingly transparent about their business or manufacturing practices. ×

I LOVE this mascara. I have been using it for years. I have tried expensive mascara from high end brands, and everything in between. This is one I always come back to. The formula is great, but I think it’s the brush that does the real magic. I have even thoroughly cleaned the bottle and brush of an old bottle that I was done with, and used the brush with one of my crazy expensive name brand mascaras. The formula does start to get a little clumpy when it starts to get old, or if you keep using too many layers (and I mean like 5 or 6 layers). Thinking about stocking up...just in case they take it away or discontinue it for some reason...

“Politically, it's really important for us to represent the importance of community building among women. We find ourselves working with women, women of color specifically—female photographers, female creative directors, women from all [specialties]—that's really important for us because so often I feel like women are not represented, even in the fashion industry, the way that they should be. Working with youth is another thing that's really important for Darlene—she's an educator outside of being a designer, so I think she feels growing up here that our youth is often forgotten about and we need to start there.”

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Accent your new glam vanity with a glittering, comfortable seat in the Michael Amini Melrose Plaza Vanity Bench . This square bench features a wide seat that's padded with plush foam. The frame is crafted from flattened steel slats and finished in a mirroresque polished chrome. Soft gray fabric upholsters the seat. The edge of the piece is trimmed with a multitude of tiny glass crystals and glimmer in the available light.

It seems like every week a fashion brand is rallying behind a political candidate, collaborating with a nonprofit, or announcing a new sustainability initiative—in other words, companies are trying to prove they are more “conscious.” Being “conscious” has become a talking point. Credit the current political climate or the idea that customers want to shop their values, but more and more designers are being vocal about where they stand on certain issues, and companies are increasingly transparent about their business or manufacturing practices. × 

Ann Lowe, the woman who made Jacqueline Kennedy’s wedding dress, carved a path for herself, becoming the first black designer to open a boutique on Madison Avenue, and paved the way for many others. (Finally, people are recognizing it.) From 1958 to 2009, the Ebony Fashion Fair, founded by businesswoman Eunice W. Johnson, created a space not just for black designers and models to show their work, but also for black shoppers to spend. By the early 2000s brands like Baby Phat were introducing products to the market that addressed the needs of this previously underserved customer, like jeans that fit curves.
While hippy styles were born in the ’60s, they developed in the ’70s to become a key look for the decade. One of the most famous styles of the era, hippy outfits often featured unique, colourful designs. While cuts were kept simple and styles remained casual, the trend was bold and expressive. Denim, suede, bright prints and patterns, and flares all played a significant role in the trend. Although full hippy outfits can appear overly excessive in today’s environment, elements from the style can easily be incorporated to create a chic and modern, hipster look.
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