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Fashion still has a lot of work to do when it comes to diversifying its talent pool. In February 2015 only 2.7 percent of the designers on the New York Fashion Week calendar were black, according to The New York Times; by February 2018 that statistic was still under 10 percent, per The Cut. And there have been regular reminders why this is critical: Designer products resembling blackface or nooses have sparked calls for boycotts and increased demands that companies take steps to diversify and educate their employees and provide new opportunities for people of color. Amid the headlines and outcry, black fashion designers keep doing the work: creating and advocating for more inclusive fashion through their products and every single facet of their business.
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It seems like every week a fashion brand is rallying behind a political candidate, collaborating with a nonprofit, or announcing a new sustainability initiative—in other words, companies are trying to prove they are more “conscious.” Being “conscious” has become a talking point. Credit the current political climate or the idea that customers want to shop their values, but more and more designers are being vocal about where they stand on certain issues, and companies are increasingly transparent about their business or manufacturing practices.
I used to be terrible about replacing my mascara on the regular, but that problem has now been solved thanks to Amazon's Subscribe & Save program. I asked my makeup artist friend for a mascara recommendation and she suggested I try this one. She did not steer me wrong! The waterproof version of this mascara *is* truly waterproof; I run and work out all the time while wearing it and have never had a problem with my mascara running. It can stand up to a LOT of sweat.
“When things shifted politically a few years ago in the U.S., it was important to me to I speak out, because I could see that a lot of marginalized communities were going to be really affected, including several of the communities I’m a part of. I felt that, as someone with a platform—albeit a small one—it was still my responsibility. Still, on a weekly basis, we upset people.”
There are women like Lizzy Okpo, who founded the women's wear brand William Okpo with her sister, Darlene; Aurora James of the mega-popular accessories label Brother Vellies, which has been spotted on Tessa Thompson and Beyoncé; and the up-and-coming Shanel Campbell of Shanel, a recent Parsons graduate who has already dressed Tracee Ellis Ross, Ciara, and Solange. For them, being “conscious” isn’t an afterthought—it’s what drives them as artists.
Whether you're prepping for a day at work or gearing up to go out with the girls, you'll be perfectly perched with this vanity set. Taking on a contemporary clean-lined silhouette, both the vanity and stool feature a metal frame with openwork cross designs and a metallic finish. A tempered glass top and storage shelf are ideal for keeping all your toiletries corralled, while an adjustable mirror lets you check your look. Plus, its seat is topped off with faux fur for a little luxe allure.
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