“It's important for designers to work for a bigger purpose, because fashion is so small. If you remove the social aspect of it and if you remove the day-to-day lifestyle of it, then we're just left with a pair of pretty shoes—and who cares? That's so disposable. You have to tell a story...you have to really touch people beyond yourself. It's bigger than you, it's bigger than us.”

“I think that every single designer needs to really be aware of how many of the things that they’re making already exist in landfills. We have a responsibility to only bring things to life that are going to live extremely long lives. For example: A lot of people are like, 'Oh, it's vegan leather'—well, vegan leather is plastic, and plastic breaks. It's not good for clothes, there's no longevity. I want to always challenge my fellow designers, creative people, and really people of all industries to say: If you're going to be manufacturing these things, how can these things be leaving a positive impact? Not just a neutral impact or a negative impact—a positive impact.”

Every girl wishes to have a glamorous dressing table with all her jewelry and makeup, let it realize your princess dream! Beautiful and elegant black dressing table with round mirror and cushioned stool. The table with 3 drawers is great for storing all your jewelry, little treasures, and makeup. A smooth tabletop provides space for cosmetics and beauty supplies and also includes a matching wooden elegant stool. This is sure to add elegance and style to your bedroom.
“It's important for designers to work for a bigger purpose, because fashion is so small. If you remove the social aspect of it and if you remove the day-to-day lifestyle of it, then we're just left with a pair of pretty shoes—and who cares? That's so disposable. You have to tell a story...you have to really touch people beyond yourself. It's bigger than you, it's bigger than us.”
“When things shifted politically a few years ago in the U.S., it was important to me to I speak out, because I could see that a lot of marginalized communities were going to be really affected, including several of the communities I’m a part of. I felt that, as someone with a platform—albeit a small one—it was still my responsibility. Still, on a weekly basis, we upset people.”

“I'm inspired by anything black. Black artists, musicians, activism. James Baldwin, Angela Davis, David Hilliard, Nina Simone—they inspired a project I just did, where each one inspired a look, but you wouldn't know from looking at it. I'm not trying to be so straightforward. If that were the case, I would just take my research and put it on a graphic T-shirt. The thing that informs all of my work is the black experience. That's just how my brain works, I can't help it. It's exciting to know that some people get the reference, no matter how secretive or subtle it may be.”


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Fashion still has a lot of work to do when it comes to diversifying its talent pool. In February 2015 only 2.7 percent of the designers on the New York Fashion Week calendar were black, according to The New York Times; by February 2018 that statistic was still under 10 percent, per The Cut. And there have been regular reminders why this is critical: Designer products resembling blackface or nooses have sparked calls for boycotts and increased demands that companies take steps to diversify and educate their employees and provide new opportunities for people of color. Amid the headlines and outcry, black fashion designers keep doing the work: creating and advocating for more inclusive fashion through their products and every single facet of their business.
There are women like Lizzy Okpo, who founded the women's wear brand William Okpo with her sister, Darlene; Aurora James of the mega-popular accessories label Brother Vellies, which has been spotted on Tessa Thompson and Beyoncé; and the up-and-coming Shanel Campbell of Shanel, a recent Parsons graduate who has already dressed Tracee Ellis Ross, Ciara, and Solange. For them, being “conscious” isn’t an afterthought—it’s what drives them as artists.
While hippy styles were born in the ’60s, they developed in the ’70s to become a key look for the decade. One of the most famous styles of the era, hippy outfits often featured unique, colourful designs. While cuts were kept simple and styles remained casual, the trend was bold and expressive. Denim, suede, bright prints and patterns, and flares all played a significant role in the trend. Although full hippy outfits can appear overly excessive in today’s environment, elements from the style can easily be incorporated to create a chic and modern, hipster look.
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