WebPDPAttributeContentDTO [id=675604655466, name=Size, value=Free Size, soldOut=false, subAttributeType=null, subAttributes=null, catalogId=675604655466, supc=SDL429815083, live=true, images=[imgs/a/8/q/Go-Glam-Black-Net-Baby-SDL429815083-1-3b1d8.jpg, imgs/a/8/q/Go-Glam-Black-Net-Baby-SDL429815083-2-070f3.jpg, imgs/a/8/q/Go-Glam-Black-Net-Baby-SDL429815083-3-e6b11.jpg], colorCode=null, thumbnail=https://n1.sdlcdn.com/imgs/a/8/q/130x152/Go-Glam-Black-Net-Baby-SDL429815083-1-3b1d8.jpg, selected=true, buyableInventory=1]
© 2019 Condé Nast. All rights reserved. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement (updated 5/25/18) and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement (updated 5/25/18) and Your California Privacy Rights. Glamour may earn a portion of sales from products that are purchased through our site as part of our Affiliate Partnerships with retailers. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. Ad Choices
I LOVE this mascara. I have been using it for years. I have tried expensive mascara from high end brands, and everything in between. This is one I always come back to. The formula is great, but I think it’s the brush that does the real magic. I have even thoroughly cleaned the bottle and brush of an old bottle that I was done with, and used the brush with one of my crazy expensive name brand mascaras. The formula does start to get a little clumpy when it starts to get old, or if you keep using too many layers (and I mean like 5 or 6 layers). Thinking about stocking up...just in case they take it away or discontinue it for some reason...
It seems like every week a fashion brand is rallying behind a political candidate, collaborating with a nonprofit, or announcing a new sustainability initiative—in other words, companies are trying to prove they are more “conscious.” Being “conscious” has become a talking point. Credit the current political climate or the idea that customers want to shop their values, but more and more designers are being vocal about where they stand on certain issues, and companies are increasingly transparent about their business or manufacturing practices. ×
© 2019 Condé Nast. All rights reserved. Use of this site constitutes acceptance of our User Agreement (updated 5/25/18) and Privacy Policy and Cookie Statement (updated 5/25/18) and Your California Privacy Rights. Glamour may earn a portion of sales from products that are purchased through our site as part of our Affiliate Partnerships with retailers. The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Condé Nast. Ad Choices
When you share your picture on social media Maybelline New York keeps such picture for the time necessary to achieve this purpose. For more information on how we use your personal data, please see our privacy policy. Remember, by sharing your picture on social media, you are bound by the social media’s terms and conditions. Maybelline New York is part of L’Oréal USA, Inc.

Seeing people like Okpo, James, and Campbell succeed by remaining steadfast in their beliefs and working to make this industry better gives me hope, yes, but it's more than that: It gives me a road map. Here, Okpo, James, and Campbell detail how they integrate their social political beliefs into their fashion—and why other designers should do the same.

While hippy styles were born in the ’60s, they developed in the ’70s to become a key look for the decade. One of the most famous styles of the era, hippy outfits often featured unique, colourful designs. While cuts were kept simple and styles remained casual, the trend was bold and expressive. Denim, suede, bright prints and patterns, and flares all played a significant role in the trend. Although full hippy outfits can appear overly excessive in today’s environment, elements from the style can easily be incorporated to create a chic and modern, hipster look.
×