Ann Lowe, the woman who made Jacqueline Kennedy’s wedding dress, carved a path for herself, becoming the first black designer to open a boutique on Madison Avenue, and paved the way for many others. (Finally, people are recognizing it.) From 1958 to 2009, the Ebony Fashion Fair, founded by businesswoman Eunice W. Johnson, created a space not just for black designers and models to show their work, but also for black shoppers to spend. By the early 2000s brands like Baby Phat were introducing products to the market that addressed the needs of this previously underserved customer, like jeans that fit curves.
To safeguard purity, reserve this product for your personal use. Treat the applicator with the hygienic care you give your eyes. Never apply this product in a moving vehicle. Do not dilute with water, saliva, or any other substance. Cap tightly after use. If a change in odor or appearance occurs, discontinue use. Do not use this or any other cosmetic if your eye is injured, irritated, or infected. Consult a physician promptly.
Fashion still has a lot of work to do when it comes to diversifying its talent pool. In February 2015 only 2.7 percent of the designers on the New York Fashion Week calendar were black, according to The New York Times; by February 2018 that statistic was still under 10 percent, per The Cut. And there have been regular reminders why this is critical: Designer products resembling blackface or nooses have sparked calls for boycotts and increased demands that companies take steps to diversify and educate their employees and provide new opportunities for people of color. Amid the headlines and outcry, black fashion designers keep doing the work: creating and advocating for more inclusive fashion through their products and every single facet of their business.
It seems like every week a fashion brand is rallying behind a political candidate, collaborating with a nonprofit, or announcing a new sustainability initiative—in other words, companies are trying to prove they are more “conscious.” Being “conscious” has become a talking point. Credit the current political climate or the idea that customers want to shop their values, but more and more designers are being vocal about where they stand on certain issues, and companies are increasingly transparent about their business or manufacturing practices. ×
Accent your new glam vanity with a glittering, comfortable seat in the Michael Amini Melrose Plaza Vanity Bench . This square bench features a wide seat that's padded with plush foam. The frame is crafted from flattened steel slats and finished in a mirroresque polished chrome. Soft gray fabric upholsters the seat. The edge of the piece is trimmed with a multitude of tiny glass crystals and glimmer in the available light.
I LOVE this mascara. I have been using it for years. I have tried expensive mascara from high end brands, and everything in between. This is one I always come back to. The formula is great, but I think it’s the brush that does the real magic. I have even thoroughly cleaned the bottle and brush of an old bottle that I was done with, and used the brush with one of my crazy expensive name brand mascaras. The formula does start to get a little clumpy when it starts to get old, or if you keep using too many layers (and I mean like 5 or 6 layers). Thinking about stocking up...just in case they take it away or discontinue it for some reason... 

While hippy styles were born in the ’60s, they developed in the ’70s to become a key look for the decade. One of the most famous styles of the era, hippy outfits often featured unique, colourful designs. While cuts were kept simple and styles remained casual, the trend was bold and expressive. Denim, suede, bright prints and patterns, and flares all played a significant role in the trend. Although full hippy outfits can appear overly excessive in today’s environment, elements from the style can easily be incorporated to create a chic and modern, hipster look.


“Politically, it's really important for us to represent the importance of community building among women. We find ourselves working with women, women of color specifically—female photographers, female creative directors, women from all [specialties]—that's really important for us because so often I feel like women are not represented, even in the fashion industry, the way that they should be. Working with youth is another thing that's really important for Darlene—she's an educator outside of being a designer, so I think she feels growing up here that our youth is often forgotten about and we need to start there.”
“Politically, it's really important for us to represent the importance of community building among women. We find ourselves working with women, women of color specifically—female photographers, female creative directors, women from all [specialties]—that's really important for us because so often I feel like women are not represented, even in the fashion industry, the way that they should be. Working with youth is another thing that's really important for Darlene—she's an educator outside of being a designer, so I think she feels growing up here that our youth is often forgotten about and we need to start there.”
×