The color was fine, but it dried down so quickly once applied, the formula was sticky before it dried down, and my lashes were spidery like I'd never seen with one application! The wand is promising, curved to the lash and the bristles well distributed but something about the product was too thick. It is very effectively waterproof. If you're looking for a subtle mascara look, this isn't the one, but if you're into a dramatic mascara (i.e. a little thick and clumpy) with little room for error during application, this mascara is the one.
That doesn't mean the work is easy. I recently founded my own business, The Folklore, an online retail concept store that stocks brands exclusively from Africa and the African diaspora. Already I’ve had to defend the earning potential of African designers to prospective non-African venture capitalists and investors, who were convinced that they wouldn’t sell well among non-African audiences. (Most of the pieces on my site have sold out.) I’ve argued against long-standing stereotypes that paint Africa’s business climate broadly as corrupt. I’ve invested my own money to launch the company, trusting that my vision will translate.
There are women like Lizzy Okpo, who founded the women's wear brand William Okpo with her sister, Darlene; Aurora James of the mega-popular accessories label Brother Vellies, which has been spotted on Tessa Thompson and Beyoncé; and the up-and-coming Shanel Campbell of Shanel, a recent Parsons graduate who has already dressed Tracee Ellis Ross, Ciara, and Solange. For them, being “conscious” isn’t an afterthought—it’s what drives them as artists.
I used to be terrible about replacing my mascara on the regular, but that problem has now been solved thanks to Amazon's Subscribe & Save program. I asked my makeup artist friend for a mascara recommendation and she suggested I try this one. She did not steer me wrong! The waterproof version of this mascara *is* truly waterproof; I run and work out all the time while wearing it and have never had a problem with my mascara running. It can stand up to a LOT of sweat.
It seems like every week a fashion brand is rallying behind a political candidate, collaborating with a nonprofit, or announcing a new sustainability initiative—in other words, companies are trying to prove they are more “conscious.” Being “conscious” has become a talking point. Credit the current political climate or the idea that customers want to shop their values, but more and more designers are being vocal about where they stand on certain issues, and companies are increasingly transparent about their business or manufacturing practices.
There are women like Lizzy Okpo, who founded the women's wear brand William Okpo with her sister, Darlene; Aurora James of the mega-popular accessories label Brother Vellies, which has been spotted on Tessa Thompson and Beyoncé; and the up-and-coming Shanel Campbell of Shanel, a recent Parsons graduate who has already dressed Tracee Ellis Ross, Ciara, and Solange. For them, being “conscious” isn’t an afterthought—it’s what drives them as artists.
When you find yourself looking through a set of toiletries and accessories for the right makeup, brushes, and everything else in the morning, it’s time to get organized. With this vanity table set, you’ll not only be able to organize your important items, but you’ll also have a designated space of your own that looks like a scene out of a movie. It’s not just you looking gorgeous: Freshen yourself up to start a day with energy and a gorgeous look with this equally gorgeous dressing...
“I'm inspired by anything black. Black artists, musicians, activism. James Baldwin, Angela Davis, David Hilliard, Nina Simone—they inspired a project I just did, where each one inspired a look, but you wouldn't know from looking at it. I'm not trying to be so straightforward. If that were the case, I would just take my research and put it on a graphic T-shirt. The thing that informs all of my work is the black experience. That's just how my brain works, I can't help it. It's exciting to know that some people get the reference, no matter how secretive or subtle it may be.”
“It's important for designers to work for a bigger purpose, because fashion is so small. If you remove the social aspect of it and if you remove the day-to-day lifestyle of it, then we're just left with a pair of pretty shoes—and who cares? That's so disposable. You have to tell a story...you have to really touch people beyond yourself. It's bigger than you, it's bigger than us.”
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